The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson


The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson, 1886

My favorite quote: “With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.”

Notable characters: Dr. Henry Jekyll, a kind Victorian gentleman; Edward Hyde, his dark side; Gabriel John Utterson, his friend

Most memorable scene: When Mr. Hyde plows over the dumb little girl on the street. That little brat got what she deserved. I’m kidding. But seriously, what was she doing out at that hour, anyway? 

Greatest strengths: Stevenson’s entire concept of duality is seriously brilliant — especially when you take into account that this was written before Freud came up with this theory about the ego and the id

Standout achievements: On top of essentially oozing atmosphere, intrigue, and suspense, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is smart — brilliant, really. Under all its Victorian charm and gothic elegance, it asks us to examine ourselves, begging the question: is man good or is he evil — or is he both? For its ability to philosophize and entertain in equal proportion, I think it deserves all the accolades it gets and then some 

Fun Facts: According to his wife, Fanny, some of the scenes from this story were inspired by Stevenson’s nightmares

Other media: More movie, film, radio, and stage adaptations than you can beat with a broken cane

What it taught me: To me, this is an example of how creative works can absolutely have layers and deeper meaning without compromising entertainment value

How it inspired me: Because of that fact that to me — whether it was the author’s intention or not — this has always been, above all else, a tale of drug and alcohol addiction, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is what inspired, in its very odd way, the venom and venom addiction aspects of my vampires in the Crimson Cove series. I wanted to express similar thoughts on the subject of addiction in an equally unobtrusive way

Additional thoughts: Somehow, I’ve never seen any of the film, television, or stage adaptations of Jekyll and Hyde. Not one! Well, unless you count the Bugs Bunny cartoons, that is

Haunt me: alistaircross.com

Published by Alistair Cross

Alistair Cross grew up on horror novels and scary movies, and by the age of eight, began writing his own stories. First published in 2012, he has since co-authored The Cliffhouse Haunting and Mother with Tamara Thorne and is working on several other projects. His debut solo novel, The Crimson Corset, was an Amazon bestseller. The Black Wasp, book 3 in The Vampires of Crimson Cove series is on its way. Find out more about him at: http://alistaircross.com ********************************************************************************************* In collaboration, Thorne and Cross are currently writing several novels, including the next volume in the continuing gothic series, The Ravencrest Saga. Their first novel, The Cliffhouse Haunting, was an immediate bestseller. Together, they hosted the horror-themed radio show Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE! which featured such guests as Anne Rice of The Vampire Chronicles, Charlaine Harris of the Southern Vampire Mysteries and basis of the HBO series True Blood, Jeff Lindsay, author of the Dexter novels, Jay Bonansinga of The Walking Dead series, Laurell K. Hamilton of the Anita Blake novels, Peter Atkins, screenwriter of Hellraiser 2, 3, and 4, worldwide bestseller V.C. Andrews, Kim Harrison of the Hollows series, and New York Times best sellers Preston & Child, Christopher Rice, and Christopher Moore. ********************************************************************************************** Currently, Thorne & Cross are hosts of Thorne & Cross: Carnival Macabre, where listeners can discover all manner of demented delights, unearth terrifying treasures, and explore the dark side of the arts.

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