Dashes of Dark Fiction


Today, I completed the first act of my current work-in-progress,”TAA,” which places me close to the halfway point, give or take a few thousand words. This deeply in, I can state with relative certainty that this is not a horror novel. Not exactly, anyway.

Because “TAA” is all about temptation, greed, and the battle between the saintly and the sinister, strong elements of horror are a given. But there are also components of romance and urban fantasy … with paranormal highlights and dashes of dark fiction.

It isn’t that I tried to keep it from being a horror story – it’s that this book simply doesn’t require the degree of darkness my other works have. The irony of this is that the theme of “TAA” is loftier than any I’ve previously undertaken.

That said, this story retains the familiar atmosphere of my solo and collaborative Thorne & Cross novels, with references to our other fictional locales, a cameo from Ethan Hunter of my last release,THE CRIMSON CORSET and, of course, sporadic guest appearances by Tamara’s conspiracy-driven radio deejay, Coastal Eddie, down in CANDLE BAY, who always seems to know a little more than he lets on.

In short, this novel is of the same twisted DNA that spawned THE CLIFFHOUSE HAUNTING and THE GHOSTS OF RAVENCREST. As a matter of fact, one of “TAA’s” main players is Nick Grayson, a deputy from Crimson Cove who has taken a new job as chief of police in the neighboring town of Prominence, where “TAA” takes place. And he’s just in time for some mind-bending phenomena, a few soul-shattering revelations, and some very, very nasty weather.

Barring any unavoidable, unforeseen catastrophes, “TAA” will be out next year – but not before the next Thorne & Cross collaboration, due out in a matter of months now – which dives into the blackest, iciest depths of psychological thrills and stay-at-home horror.

But that’s another blog post.

 

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Writing Surprises: Things I Didn’t Expect to Find Out About Writing…


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From setting a good scene, to creating believable dialogue, there’s a lot to learn about writing, but writers aren’t always in the student position. Writing is also a great teacher; storytelling is an age-old practice that has shaped and inspired us since the dawn of time.

A while back, I started a list of things that surprised me about the writing business. I did this simply because it was interesting to me, and now I’ve decided to share a few of my findings. Take from it what you will. These are the things I didn’t understand until I started writing with my whole heart. They haven’t necessarily made me love the process any more or any less, but they are my experiences and I speak only for myself here.

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  • Writers who don’t write? Yes, they exist… and they’re everywhere. I know it sounds critical, but I’ve known dozens of ‘writers’ who do everything but actually write, and they love telling you all the reasons they can’t make it happen. Children, day jobs, unsupportive spouses, housekeeping, you name it – the ways a person can make themselves into victims of circumstance are endless and this kind of avoidance often requires as much creativity as actual writing. I don’t know where the reward in this lifestyle is, but there must be one because of non-writing writers, there are plenty. Though their intentions may be grand, the fact is that you can’t intend your way into writing a book. Until I dig my heels in and put writing first, I can call myself a writer, but no one is going to take me seriously – and that’s what’s fair.

 

  • Writers are artists! And publicists, and marketers, and business owners, and… a lot of other things, too! So you want to be a writer. Great! Now you just need to brush up on your personal relations skills, develop a brand, finish that book, find an audience for it, and start the next novel! The days of writing and leaving everything else to the publishers are gone. Maybe those days will return, maybe they won’t, but one thing is certain: publishers, for the most part, can’t support you. They, like everyone else, are low on resources and trying to recover economically. And even if they did all of your marketing, they don’t manage the business that is your career. And it is a business. As a writer, you’re an entrepreneur; a businessperson. You need to know a lot more than how to write a book – even if it’s a damn good one. Career writing is in an entirely different playing field than hobby writing. In fact, it’s not even the same sport.

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  • It’s all about illusion. We all know that everything we see on TV – even the “reality” stuff – has been refined and prepared for public consumption before it reaches us. That’s because, by its very nature, entertainment relies on glamour, refinement, and illusion. And writing is entertainment. As an author, you are a public figure, and you can’t be a dull one. Back in the old days, authors were mostly faceless storytellers that readers knew nothing about. Now, thanks to social media, readers can connect with authors, and they expect to. These days, writers need to be aware of how they present themselves. It’s confusing for readers to see their favorite author of serial-killer slash-trash beaming into the camera like a flower child on Prozac as he pushes his tow-headed nephew on a swing. It’s equally conflicting when you come across the Facebook photos of a children’s author face-down and ass up in a puddle of her own sick after a party. Writers are brands and readers have expectations about what kinds of people they are based on what they write. And to fail to deliver is to disappoint your audience.

 

  • Time is a cruel mistress. When you have deadlines, there isn’t time to waste, so a lot of pastimes must go by wayside. I’ve come to realize that when I’m not writing, I should be plotting, researching, or working on marketing, lest I fall into the naïve philosophy generated – and perpetuated – by authors who presume the world cares that they’ve written a novel. People don’t care until you give them a reason to care, and that takes time. Take days off, yes, but like money, time is either spent or invested, so I have to be aware of where mine goes. With the exception of a few TV shows, I don’t like television, and I’ve cut down social activity to the things I really enjoy. For the most part, I live by this philosophy: If you aren’t part of the path, get off the road. It’s harsh perhaps, but I know I wasn’t put here to socialize, have babies, or make lots of friends. I was put here to create something bigger than me. I’m not a sentimental person, and if cutting the fat so I can spend more time writing makes me a dick, I’m comfortable with that.

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  • But I wrote a whole book! Every book you write stimulates the sales of your previous books and from observing other writers, I’ve learned that writing one book, or two for that matter, isn’t enough to build much interest. If that one book is all I want to write, that’s fine too, but if I’m looking to have a career, I need more than one or two products to offer.

 

  • They came to be entertained. If you are a fiction author looking to teach before entertain, you had better be very subtle about it. Readers rarely browse the fiction sections looking for life lessons. Fiction readers mainly want to be entertained, and in much the same way viewers don’t care if J-Lo is an amazing cake-decorator in her free time, no one cares about your degrees, or what invaluable wisdom your great Aunt Ethel passed down to you. These things give you no prevalence here. Do you know how to tell a compelling story…? That is the question.

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  • There are no days off. When you aren’t writing, you’re still writing. That’s all I have to say about that.

 

  • Sometimes… the voices really do tell me what to do. We’ve all heard writers say things like, “Oh, I just let my characters tell me the story.” It sounds so fickle, and yet, it’s the God’s honest truth. I try to keep my characters under some control to be sure the plot doesn’t go off track but these make-believe people really do have agendas of their own. It’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand; but for me, it’s just part of the joy. I don’t want to analyze it, I just love that it happens.

 

  • People want to be part of your progress. When it’s innocent, it’s a testament to the good in people. Your real friends are thrilled that you’re doing something you love and they celebrate the accomplishments with you. This is the support group you’ll need when things get tough, and these folks are rare. Hold them close because there’s another type of person who wants to be part of your progress too, except their motives are different. These guys like to take credit for your success. Or they like to think they’ve inspired your art – that you base your characters off them, write your poetry about them, and paint your paintings in the likeness of their divine beauty. It’s embarrassing. And instead of being joyful of your success, these guys will wave your hard work away and say you “got lucky.” Some of these folks are other writers and some are not… but all of them are unfulfilled and unable to find their own power in the world. They’ve resorted to stoking someone else’s fire just to get close to some sparks. Cut these people away from you like a mole that just changed color.

 

  • You really can make a living doing this. Maybe that wasn’t true in 1950. Maybe it wasn’t even true in 1998, but today, if you produce quality work, put effort into marketing, make informed decisions, and continue building a backlog of material, you can thrive as a writer. I know many people who do. Some of them are with one of the “Big Five” and some of them are self-published on Amazon. They have nothing in common with each other regarding genre, age, sex, or race. But what they do have is grit and determination. They all make time to write, they all work hard, they all finish what they start, and none of them are willing to let the world – or anyone in it – tell them they can’t do it.

Walking Fine Lines… and Writing Them, Too


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Even as a kid, I loved writing and spent hours composing poems, song lyrics, and scribbling out short stories. As I grew older, my interest in the craft continued to build, but none of these formats gave me the room I needed. For me, writing novels was the next logical step. Between 1997 and 2005, I made countless starts on would-be cliffhangers, murder mysteries, and nail-biting tales of terror. But, as it turns out, writing a book is a lot more grueling and complicated than the masters make it out to be, and none of these early unfinished efforts survived outside of my notebooks.

Then in 2005, after one of those rare life-changing revelations everyone talks about, I finally decided I was going to do this writing thing… and I wasn’t taking no for an answer. It helped that, for the first time, I had a solid story line that was good enough to be told, and perhaps, more importantly, I was finally old enough to tell it. And so I began…

When you start a book and don’t finish it, it hangs around your head until you get it right – for years, if it has to. I did finish the novel I began in 2005, but I didn’t finish the story. For the next few years, the manuscript was in circulation, promptly being rejected left and right. While the Thanks-But-No-Thanks’ continued piling up, I kept writing – and when you keep writing, an interesting thing happens: you get better at it. I eventually got published – but it was the next novel, a different one – not the one I’d spent so much time on. By then, I knew my writing had improved and I pulled the first manuscript out of circulation. After re-reading it, I could clearly see why it wasn’t selling. I decided it needed a serious facelift before I submitted it anywhere else. Discouraged, I set it aside and started the next book.

In 2012, I met Tamara (Thorne, co-author). We hit it off, had the same sensibilities about writing, and immediately began making plans. In collaboration, we’ve since completed two novels, one ongoing serialized Gothic tale, and have become the hosts of our own horror-themed internet radio show, Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE!  As 2014 came to a close, I finally had a few things under my belt, and I knew it was time to return to that solo novel.

I’ve had to dig my heels in a little – at times I’ve surely been nothing short of an asshole – but as of January 1st, every previous version of my solo novel has been torn down, totaled, and trashed, and I am 25,000 words into the new one.

I love collaborating with Tamara, and although I never envisioned collaborating with anyone, I’m grateful beyond my capacity to express it that she, an already established bestseller, took enough interest in me to make me a part of her journey. I couldn’t have foreseen such a thing five years ago; I was unconscious to any such possibility, but my gratitude is timeless, and as long as she’s inclined, I will continue writing with her. But I must also build a body of solo work.

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I’m learning that hosting a radio show and bouncing between collaborating and writing solo requires a good deal of balance – it’s a lot to take on. There are days I’m overwhelmed. Some mornings, I wake up wondering where to begin, and wishing I could take the day off.  But then I get up, get on it, and soon I’m into the rhythm of things – and even on the bad days, I don’t take it for granted. This is what I wanted. For years, I have been obsessed by writing, not as a hobby, but as a profession. For the past decade, I’ve spent every waking hour trying to find a way to make it happen, and now that I feel like I’ve finally gotten my career off the ground, I’m going back to the beginning – back to the first story I really wanted to tell.

My solo novel’s original title was The White Room, but – for many reasons – I’m no longer calling it that. It has a stronger voice and it deserves a stronger title. I’ve given it one, but until I’m closer to completion, I simply call it “CC.” “CC” is a vampire novel, but its themes are not romantic. Under its fangs – if I do it right – it’s a tale of redemption, addiction, and the power of family ties. At 25,000 words, I’m only about one-third into it, but already, I am more deeply in love with it than I’ve ever been before. It has dimensions I wasn’t able to explore until now. It tells a deeper, more powerful story this time. It’s found its missing spine.

In the ten years since its conception, this book has been revised, revamped, re-written, kicked, mauled, set aside, and left for dead. It’s had a pretty rough life, but it’s on track at last, and I’ll do everything in my power to prevent it from being knocked off the rails again. I intend to complete it this spring.

Regarding Thorne & Cross, it’s great to be preparing for the release of The Ghosts of Ravencrest’s fifth installment, Night Moves, which has been sent to the editor and heads to production next week. We’re also looking forward to the completion of our witchy tale of terror – and first collaborative concept – Grandma’s Rack, which, right this very minute, is being polished and refined for public consumption. Our other completed novel, which we have to be tight-lipped about for now, is in some stage or another of the publication process, and as soon as the vacancy sign lights up – which we anticipate happening in March or April – we have the next collaboration waiting in the wings. It’s a stormy little thriller that we’re both itching to get to, and I have a feeling this one is going to make some major waves…

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The End Is Upon Us


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If you had told me ten years ago, when I really got serious about this writing thing, that I would one day write a novel with Tamara Thorneone of my longtime horror heroes – I would have scoffed, chortled, guffawed and otherwise vehemently disbelieved you. But as I’ve always said, life has a curious way of providing you with what you actively seek, and today, that is exactly what happened. Tamara Thorne and I have just finished our novel. We have written the final words. The first draft is complete. Weighing in at a staggering 171,486 words, the story wrapped itself up at 7:15 pm today.

We started this book about four months ago while finishing up the first draft of another horror novel called Grandma’s Rack. We took this sudden sharp turn for a few reasons. First, Grandma’s Rack needed to sit a while so we could return to it with fresh eyes before finalizing it. We’d hit it hard and fast and both felt it needed some air. Then, another writing prospect emerged, one with a deadline, and one that would – as the fates would have it – fulfill the initial story line Tamara and I discussed when we first decided to write together.

Although, for professional reasons, I can’t say much about this book’s plot, I can say that it was inspired by our experiences during the five nights we spent at an allegedly haunted cabin in California’s gold country a while back (you can read a night-by-night account of that here). I can also say that this novel includes a character of mine who was developed in 2011, during the writing of Beautiful Monster, that I haven’t, until now, been able to find a home for. He fits nicely into this book.

As for the process, these have been the most demanding circumstances I’ve written under. For four months, we’ve worked eight to twelve hour days, six – and more recently – seven days a week, and the rigid time crunch hasn’t been the only factor contributing to the intensity. This plot is complex – more intricate than anything I’ve written. It’s character-dense with upward of a dozen major players, each with his or her own story, and each requiring enough stage time to tell it.

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I’ve had to learn how to weave multiple threads, fuse varying subplots, and play puppet master to a slew of characters with intertwining story lines. I’ve loved every minute of it, even though the whole thing has been painstakingly meticulous. Even the setting is complex – a small California resort town that we built one character, one tiny life-like detail, at a time. Admittedly, it’s the kind of place I’d love to live in – minus all the violence and depravity, of course – but this kind of world-building is mentally taxing and surprisingly exhausting. However, I am by no means complaining. This is the kind of novel I’ve always wanted to write.

This book has taught me more about writing than anything else ever has. Ever. And I’m learning from the best. Tamara, who is a veteran to this lifestyle, has surfed the waves smoothly and without visible distress. I, on the other hand, am cranky, fatigued, and at this point, brain dead. But we did it, and ridiculously, as we neared the end, I think we both felt a little twinge of sadness. Even though we intend to write together more in the future, this is the last time it will ever be the first time we wrote a book together. I will treasure this for the rest of my life.

Now that the book is written, we begin the process of cutting and revising. Given its tremendous length, this will be an interesting task, but we will nip, tuck, and tighten by any means necessary in order to sculpt this story into the finest, most powerful version of itself possible, and I know we will be fine.

Due to the particular publishing process of this book, I have no idea when it will be released, but as soon as finishing touches are complete, we will be sending it to the editor, and then we will be returning to, and finishing off Grandma’s Rack, which will be available by the end of this year. In the interim, we’re working on the third installment of Belinda, which will be undergoing some favorable changes that will be apparent with the new release.

In closing, I want to thank everyone around me for supporting this project and respecting my inability these past weeks to do anything but sit in front of my computer and write, write, write. I still have a lot to do, and it will be a while before I have a lot of free time, but I will have a little more of it after a few more weeks. I think, anyway…

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110,000 Words… and Counting…


Tamara Thorne and I are kicking literary ass these days. A few hours ago, we hit 110,000 words on our collaborative project (not Belinda, and not Grandma’s Rack, but the other book).

Had this novel been content to conclude itself at the average length of 80,000 to 120,000 words, it would be complete, but as it is, we anticipate another 20,000 before we write The End. There will, of course, be some cutting, but no matter how we look at it, this will be a good-sized book ~ and that makes me very proud of us.

This story line is the one that brought Tamara and I together in 2012, so it has special meaning for me. We got to know each other plotting this novel out over the phone, hundreds of miles apart. We ended up setting it aside to write Grandma’s Rack, then, due to publishing obligations, set Grandma’s Rack aside to return to – and finish – this one. The reason for this juggling act is mainly due to the fact that Grandma’s Rack was originally intended to be a short story. And it grew. A lot.

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Also, while all this was happening, we managed to get the first few installments of our serialized Gothic Erotica novel, The Erotic Adventures of Belinda, written and out into the hands of the readers at the time we promised them it would be available.  What all of this has meant is that we’ve had to spend 8 to 12 hours a day, 6 (and now 7) days a week, writing, editing, and doing various other writing-related necessities. It’s meant we’ve had little to no free time. It’s meant we’ve had to say no to a lot of our friends and family members. It’s meant we’ve had to pull the plugs on some processes that weren’t quite geared for our degree of production. It’s meant we’ve worked our asses off. But we did it, and we did it well.

As I write this, Tamara is waiting for me in the Cloud where, after a short break, we will continue writing out the final scenes of this novel. It will be completed shortly. And after that… it’s back to Grandma’s Rack, which will pretty much keep us just as busy. What a year it has been. And will continue to be…

On Writing: Extreme Collaborating


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A radio interviewer asked Tamara Thorne and me how we write together and that was one of the most eye-opening questions we’ve ever had.  She was amazed when we told her our method and said she’d never heard of anyone writing like that before.  Evidently, many writers split things up with one brainstorming and the other writing. Neither of us can even imagine having any fun doing our job this way.  To not be allowed to brainstorm would be horrible!  And to not write would be just as bad!  We can each imagine this working in non-fiction, but in fiction, if you don’t love both sides – creating and writing – where does that leave you? How can you imagine ideas for your plot and characters without being able to set them down as well, and vice versa? Can a good writer write without his or her imagination taking off and soaring to the heavens?  It sounds absolutely horrible to us.

Our collaborations are a 50/50 effort. We plot together, we develop characters together, and we even transcribe together by getting on Skype, opening the Cloud, and working side by side. Sometimes Tamara takes the lead, sometimes Alistair does – but nothing is written without both of us present. We each have our own individual strengths and weaknesses, and we each are aware of the other’s. Luckily for us – as we learned early on – our weaknesses and strengths balance out; where one of us has difficulty, the other is at ease.

One very important part of our process that we stress very much when asked about it, is the personal side of our relationship. Writing is a job, a business, and although we are business partners, we are also friends. We may share the same vision, the same sensibilities, and even similar writing styles, but all of this is pointless without three very important elements: respect, honesty, and loyalty.

Respect comes first. We are aware of each other’s time. We meet every day, six days a week, and work anywhere from 8 to 10 hours. But if something comes up or one of us is running late, we are okay with that.

As for honesty… honesty is something you have to be comfortable with if you intend to write with another person. If one of us hates what the other is writing – though it hasn’t really happened – we’d say so… but kindly. If one of us isn’t feeling the same vibe as the other and thinks the story needs to go a different direction, we discuss it openly.

No drama. We are similar in that we both avoid drama – and the people who spew it – so one of us getting drawn into the chaos of the other one’s personal life issues is never a problem for us. This zero tolerance for drama, in fact, is probably the glue that holds this whole thing together. (Sure, we each tell the other what’s going on in our lives – we’re friends and that’s what friends do – but we don’t dwell. We go to work.)

So kindness, honesty, and a no drama policy is what makes up the respect facet of this deal. Then there is loyalty.

Loyalty comes into play because we are given a lot of advice by outside forces, and sometimes, the advice is not good. We’ve made a firm pact that no decisions will be made without the consent of the other one. No one is allowed to call one of us and discuss changes behind the other’s back. We are business partners, and we operate as such, no exceptions.

With loyalty comes trust, which could easily be the fourth part of the sum. We trust each other with the characters, the storyline, and on a personal level as well, but this trust is built on the foundation of the respect, honesty, and loyalty to which we adhere.

And now that the personal elements of our collaboration have been covered, we come to the creative part of the process.

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Each day we spend an hour or two in the morning warming up. We chat, we do our PR and marketing work, whether it’s writing a blog, posting to Facebook, or answering interview questions. We spend a little time studying some aspect of our business most mornings as well, whether that’s going through a lot of covers or promotional posters and talking about what we like and dislike, discussing articles we’ve just read on traditional vs indie publishing, or anything else writing-oriented.  We tell some jokes. We laugh a lot.

And then we get down to writing.  If we’re having trouble getting going, we get silly, each sneaking in outrageous dialogue or descriptions for the other to laugh at. That’s actually one of the best tricks we’ve found for getting a scene moving. We’ll add on to the silliness, each of us, and suddenly the scene comes to life and, when we’re done, we remove the goofy stuff.

We each enjoy following certain characters and take the lead on our favorites, but we are also careful to switch off so that we each know every character well.  To us, familiarity with our characters – all of them – is vital to the story.

While, individually, we both do a lot of world-building in order to get to know our characters and their locale, together, we probably spend twice as much time doing this.  When you are collaborating, the littlest details become important and are (usually) best figured out beforehand because both of us must know whether a character has dimples or drives a beat-up old Chevy or hates seafood.  Otherwise, incongruities can get past us, unnoticed.

The characters’ voices, however, evolve during writing and whoever creates the voice sets the tone the other follows for that character. For example, a character in one of our upcoming novels has a unique way of swearing that Alistair made up.  We both love voicing her and work together to get the most insane profanities out of her as we write, always following Alistair’s original style.

While we occasionally write two scenes in tandem – this usually happens when we are writing one scene together and one of us is inspired by something the other writes – we still consider ourselves to be writing together; after all, via Skype, we have instant access to one another.  After that, we go over both scenes together and make sure everything is in synch and do a light edit.  Mostly, though, we quite literally write together. One of us may write most of a scene with the other trailing along fixing things, or simply taking in the tale as it evolves. Sometimes we take turns in the same scene. Tamara often takes over descriptions of locale because she really enjoys it. Alistair enjoys writing certain situations and takes those. We think the main reason one or the other of us takes the lead, though, is character. We each have our favorites.

We write in similar voices and have similar sensibilities, senses of humor, likes and dislikes, and this, of course, is part of our chemistry. But if you have a collaborator you constantly disagree with, our question is why?  If you have nothing in common, how can you enjoy your work – or one another?

We received some great feedback the other day. After reading The New Governess, the first installment of our Gothic Erotica serialized novel, The Erotic Adventures of Belinda, a reader said to us: “Which one of you wrote this? I can’t tell.” To which we happily answered, “We both wrote it.” And we did.  Just like we wrote this blog. Together, in the Cloud.

For more, visit us at: http://alistaircross.com & http://tamarathorne.com

Rackin’ it Up


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Grandma’s Rack, the short story turned novella turned full-length collaborative novel is bouncing right along with enough speed and determination to rival a pair of smooth, round, metaphorical melons bounding down a steep and obstacle-free figurative mountainside.

Today, my co-author – veteran horror novelist Tamara Thorne – and I spent three hours brainstorming new scenes and smoothing out the plot before heading separate directions to each spend several more hours writing. Tomorrow, we meet to establish and appoint the final components of the book’s third act which, once completed, will catapult us into an even more accelerated momentum. We realize that completing the project by the spring deadline will be pushing it, but we also believe it can be done. We’re in the last stages and luckily, we’re having enough fun that what’s left to write will hopefully flow smoothly by. I go through a series of mental and emotional stages during the course of completing a novel, and the one I’m in now is probably my favorite.

By the third act, the climax is rising, and all those things the characters said and did pages and pages ago suddenly start to make sense. This is where we are now in Grandma’s Rack, and it is my favorite because it assures me that my instincts to trust the characters were correct. It’s been said that writers don’t create story as much as they discover story – like some creative archaeologists of sorts, digging up pre-existing plots from the trenches of the mind, the universe… or wherever it is that stories come from – and I am inclined to believe that.

Today, during our three-hour brainstorming stint, all the misfit pieces of the puzzle fell wonderfully and magically into place, revivifying my passion and magnifying my feeling that this was going to be a great story. In fact, although I always knew it was going to be good, today I realized that it’s going to be even better than I thought because I realized it has all the ingredients that are key to the kinds of books I love to read: characters of both the loathsome and lovable kind – traits which are often found within the confines of the same character –  a seductive setting,  an intriguing plot with a fair blend of humor and horror, a series of little scandals, and enough human truth to sustain the creative inventiveness of fiction.

And so… we plug on, and as we do, I become more excited as the end draws ever-nearer. I suspect it will be a bittersweet farewell once the final words have been written… and this is why we have decided to continue working together. Tamara and I both have our solo projects to write, but we’ve decided our power as a unit is too total and too dynamic to end at one collaboration… and this is just one those little life wonders that forces me to think that maybe… there’s some method to the madness around us after all.

To see more of Grandma’s Rack and other projects, visit me at: www.alistaircross.com

Yours,

~AC~

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